Blog: Picture Day

Two pairs of dancers are up next. The first pair is animalistic, their dance is almost aggressive, a little primal. The second pair is sensual, bordering the erotic. Again we are called to compare and contrast the relationships depicted for us. What do they reflect about human nature? This is one of the attributes of great art— it calls us to question and reflect on our own nature, the innermost part of our being.

Todays in-rehearsal performance began to stitch together everything observed in performances so far. A photographer has come today, standing in the front of the room at the ready, almost part of the aesthetic himself.

The dance begins with a solo dancer. The music is ethereal and creates a blank space— who is the dancer, what does she represent? Her hands move subconsciously around her body, taking note of her face and torso, waist and legs. Soon she is joined by a male dancer. Their relationship unfolds and it’s clear that he is determined to care for her, yet she leaves him coldly in the end. He is met with a different dancer, and this time his actions are reciprocated. A commentary on relationships, vulnerability, rejection.

These dancers leave the floor and two male dancers take the stage. They are synchronized in their dances. Following their performance, a girl mimics them exactly at twice the speed. The dances are fast paced and intense— breath is audible and becomes part of the aesthetic, at least up close.

Two pairs of dancers are up next. The first pair is animalistic, their dance is almost aggressive, a little primal. The second pair is sensual, bordering the erotic. Again we are called to compare and contrast the relationships depicted for us. What do they reflect about human nature? This is one of the attributes of great art— it calls us to question and reflect on our own nature, the innermost part of our being.

– Elise Lawrence, Intern

June 03, 2016